What Is the Purpose of Heart Valves?

The valves of the heart cooperate with one another to guarantee that blood is pumped to the rest of the body. According to the information provided by the American Heart Association, the tricuspid valve, the mitral valve, the aortic valve, and the pulmonary valve make up the heart’s four valves.

The tricuspid valve is responsible for closing off the right atrium, opening to enable blood to pass from the right atrium to the right ventricle, and closing again when the blood has been pumped out of the right ventricle. The mitral valve, on the other hand, performs these same activities, but it does so in conjunction with the left atrium and ventricle. According to the American Heart Association, the valve serves to prevent blood from flowing from the left atrium into the left ventricle and then opens to let blood pass in the opposite direction.

Both the pulmonary and the aortic valves perform duties that are comparable to one another. When open, the aortic valve prevents blood from flowing backwards into the left ventricle of the heart and instead directs it into the aorta. Blood is pumped throughout the body starting at the aorta and ending at the heart. When open, the pulmonary valve prevents blood from flowing back into the right ventricle and instead directs it into the pulmonary artery. According to the American Heart Association, the pulmonary artery is responsible for transporting blood into the lungs so that it may be oxygenated. In the event that even one of these valves fails to perform its function as it should, there is a possibility that blood will flow in the other way or will not circulate adequately throughout the body.