How to Unjam a Bostitch Stapler

Answer

Punch {{!! -!! }} Hammer {{!! -!! It is important to refrain from hitting the jammed staple in a construction stapler as this may cause the situation to become much more severe. {{!! -!! Stanley, a behemoth in the tool industry, owns the fastener manufacturer Bostitch. The 16-gauge medium is available on several construction staplers. It utilises staples that have a width of either one half of an inch or one full inch. A thin crown measuring 7/16 of an inch may be seen on the staples produced by a stapler with a gauge of 17. Box frame staplers, lathing staplers, which may also be used for light-duty structural assembly, and sheathing staplers, which are also used for siding, are all examples of applications for these types of staplers. In addition to that, they manufacture manual heavy-duty staplers and desk staplers. Even though they are advertised as being jam-free, the staplers do sometimes get jammed. {{!! -!! Ensure that the construction stapler is disconnected from its source of air. To do this task, you will need a hammer and a punch. For staplers that are not used in construction, you may skip this step. {{!! -!! Raise the driver so that it is above the obstructed staple, then push forward. To do this, position the punch such that it is at the very end of the driver, where it should be seen coming out of the nose. To remove the leftover staples from a manual or desktop stapler, first remove the pusher or follower block, and then remove the staples one by one. Put a pencil in the space where the staples used to hold the magazine together are protruding, and then use the pencil to apply pressure many times. {{!! -!! If you tap the hammer against the punch, you should be able to clear the jam. You need just strike the driver. It’s the only moving element there.

Hammer

Warning

Don’t hit the jammed staple in a construction stapler; it can make the problem worse.

Bostitch is owned by tools-giant Stanley. Construction staplers include 16-gauge medium. The staples for it are either ½ inch in width or 1 inch in width. There is a 17-gauge stapler and its staples have a 7/16-inch narrow crown. Applications include box frame staplers, lathing staplers, which can be used for light-duty structural assembly, and sheathing staplers, which are also used for siding. They also make desk staplers and heavy-duty manual staplers. Sometimes the staplers will jam, despite being called jam-free.

  1. Disconnect the construction stapler from the air supply. Use a hammer and punch to do this. Ignore this step for nonconstruction staplers.

  2. Push the driver upwards and past the jammed staple. Do this by putting the punch at the tip of the driver, which you should see coming out of the nose. In the case of a desk stapler, or manual stapler, remove the pusher or follower block, and remove the remaining staples. Insert a pencil behind where the staples come out under the magazine and press down a few times with the pencil.

  3. Tap the hammer against the punch and the jam should clear. Only hit the driver. It’s the only moving part there.